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All the goals which a school presents, the ways and methods which it brings into existence are the corollaries of the conception of the world that it entertains. Theoretical wisdom is to know the existing things as they are. Practical wisdom is to find out how one should lead his life. This 'should' is the logical result of 'how they are', especially those 'how they are, with which metaphysical philosophy deals. Evidently we should not confuse the conception of the world with its sense perception. Conception of the world has the sense of cosmogony and is linked with the question of identification.

Unlike sense perception, which is common to man and other living beings, identification is peculiar to man, and hence conception of the world is also peculiar to him. It depends on his thinking and understanding. From the point of view of sense perception of the world, many animals are more advanced than man, because either they are equipped with certain senses which man lacks, as it is said that birds have a radar sense, or their senses, although common to them and man, are sharper than the senses possessed by man, as is said of the sight of the eagle, of the sense of smell of the dog and ant and of the sense of hearing of the rat.

Man is superior to other animals because he has a deep conception of the world. Animals only perceive the world, but man can interpret it also. What is identification? What is the relationship between perception and identification? What elements other than perceptional ones are part of identification?

How do they enter identification and from where? What is the mechanism of identification? What is the standard by which correct and incorrect identification are judged? These are the questions which require a separate treatise, and at present we are unable to take them up. Anyhow, it is certain that perception of a thing is different from its identification. Many people view a scene and all of them see it alike, but only a few of them can interpret it, and they too often differ?

On the whole there are three kinds of world conception or world identification or, in other words, man's interpretation of the universe. It can be inspired by three sources: science, philosophy and religion. So we can say that there are three kinds of world conception: scientific, philosophical and religious. Now let us see how and to what extent science helps us form an opinion. Science is based on two things, theory and experiment. For the discovery and interpretation of a phenomenon first a theory comes to the mind of a scholar and then on its basis he carries out experiments in the laboratory.

If it is corroborated by the experiment, it gains acceptance as a scientific principle and remains valid till a better and a more comprehensive theory appears and is corroborated by experiment. With the appearance of a new and more comprehensive theory, the old theory becomes invalid.

That is how science discovers the cause and the effect of a experiment. Then it again tries to discover the cause of that cause and the effect of that effect. This process continues so long as possible. The scientific work has many advantages and disadvantages as it is based on practical experiment. The greatest advantage of the scientific discoveries is that they are specific and particular. Science can impart to man a lot of information about a particular It can give a volume of knowledge about one single leaf of a tree.

Furthermore, because it acquaints man with the particular laws governing each thing, it enables him to control and use things his advantage, and thus promotes industry and technology. Though science can teach man thousands of things about a particular thing, yet the knowledge imparted by science being specific, its scope is limited. Experiments place a limitation in it. Science can go forward only to the extent it is possible for it to make an experiment.

Obviously it cannot experiment with the entire creation and all its aspects. Science can go forward in pursuit of causes and effects only to a certain extent and then it reaches the stage of 'unknown'. It is like a powerful searchlight which illuminates a limited area, and does not throw light beyond its range. No experiment can be made on such questions whether this world has a beginning and an end or is it infinite from both sides? When a scholar reaches this point, he consciously or unconsciously resorts to philosophy to express his opinion. From the stand point of science this world is an old book the first and the last pages of which have been lost.

Neither its beginning is known nor its end. The reason is that the scientific conception of the world is the outcome of the knowledge of a part of, not of the whole. Science informs us of the position of some parts of the world, not of the features and the characteristics of the whole of it. The scientific conception of the world held by scientists is like the conception of an elephant acquired by those who passed their hands on it in darkness.

He who touched the ear of the elephant thought that it was like a fan; he who touched its leg thought that it was like a pillar and he who touched its back thought that it was like a raised platform. Another drawback of the scientific conception of the world is that it cannot be the basis of any ideology, for science is inconstant and changeable from its practical aspect, that is the aspect of showing reality as it is and inviting faith in the nature of the reality of creation.

Scientifically the features of the world change from day to day, because science is based on a combination of theory and experiment and not on self-evident rational truths. The theory and experiment have a temporary value only. As such the scientific conception of the world is an inconstant and changeable conception and is not fit to become the basis of faith. Faith requires a more stable or rather an eternal basis. The scientific conception of the world, because of the limitation imposed on it by the tools of science theory and experiment , is unable to answer a number of questions, the definite answer of which is essential for an ideology.

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Such questions are: From where has this world come? Where does it go? From the viewpoint of time has the world a beginning and an end? What is its position from the viewpoint of place? Is or is not the existence, on the whole, something good and meaningful? Is the world governed by some essential and unchangeable norms and laws, or does no such thing exists? Is the creation on the whole a living and conscious unit or is man alone an accidental exception? Can an existing thing become non-existent or a non-existing thing become existent? Is the restoration of a non-existing thing possible or impossible?

Is the exact re-creation of the world and history in all their details possible even after billions of years Theory of recurring in Cycles? Is unity preponderant or multiplicity? Is the world divided into material and non-material, and is the material world a small part of the entire world? Is the world rightly guided and perceptive or is it imperceptible and blind? I agree with hand-sewing being a meditative organic process outside of strict embroidery rules. Great highlighting of blood as essential menstrual blood a thing which only women possess and know.

I am moved by this body of work. It really makes me stop and think about the word bride and all of the meanings that one word can conjure. So complex, so many layers. Enjoyed this article so very much! Beautiful work and extremely inspiring. Thank you so much for sharing your lovely thoughts and ideas. Your email address will not be published. Get updates from TextileArtist. Willemien de Villiers: From conception to creation. View all articles by Heidi Ingram. About the author View all articles by Heidi Ingram.

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What the artists say. I am constantly sending students there and sharing it with other practitioners". Cas Holmes Textile Artist and teacher. A fantastic inspirational resource". Carol Naylor Textile and Embroidery Artist. Most Popular. On Textile Artist. Book review: Stitch Stories by Cas Holmes. Are you a textile technique addict? Do you have the mind-set of a professional artist?

Best sewing machines for embroidery. Diagnosis: Artistic paralysis. Top textile art magazines: Our recommendations. Buying used sewing machines. Finding clarity in your creative process. Pinterest for textile artists: the basics. Facebook for artists: 20 ways to get more fans. Michael Crompton: Textile weaver. Breaking through blocks: 10 ways to reclaim your practice. History Review TextileArtist. Most Viewed. Displaying and hanging textile art. Bren Boardman: Sketchbooks and mind mapping for artists. Best cameras for photographing artwork. Textile artists inspired by nature.

Featured textile artist Cas Holmes: To do different. Book review: TextileArt Around the World. Best fabric scissors: Ask the experts. I am constantly sending students there and sharing it with other practitioners". Cas Holmes Textile Artist and teacher. A fantastic inspirational resource". Carol Naylor Textile and Embroidery Artist. Most Popular. On Textile Artist.

Book review: Stitch Stories by Cas Holmes. Are you a textile technique addict? Do you have the mind-set of a professional artist? Best sewing machines for embroidery. Diagnosis: Artistic paralysis. Top textile art magazines: Our recommendations. Buying used sewing machines.

Julie French: From conception to creation

Finding clarity in your creative process. Pinterest for textile artists: the basics. Facebook for artists: 20 ways to get more fans.

Michael Crompton: Textile weaver. Breaking through blocks: 10 ways to reclaim your practice. History Review TextileArtist. Most Viewed. Displaying and hanging textile art. Bren Boardman: Sketchbooks and mind mapping for artists. Best cameras for photographing artwork. Textile artists inspired by nature. Featured textile artist Cas Holmes: To do different. Book review: TextileArt Around the World.

2) Theological significance of the Virginal Conception

Best fabric scissors: Ask the experts. Print textile artists. Nigel Cheney interview: Manipulate, construct, embellish. Creative embroidery by top textile artists. Carol Naylor interview: The best second best. Top 5 UK textile art groups. Melissa Zexter interview: Embroidered photography. Floral textile artists. Best embroidery scissors: Ask the experts. Top textile printing books. Kirsty Whitlock interview: Embroidery transforms.

Finding inspiration for textile art by Cas Holmes. Debbie Smyth: Inspired by memories. Sketchbooks for textile artists by Lynne Butt.


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